Archive for the ‘ Depth of field ’ Category

photometry

Returning after a short break (at least from being featured here), we have more from compositional star Jenny Downing.

photometry

While the concept of a still life comprising a pair of empty wine glasses is nothing new, this has to be one of the best results I have seen in the area. As can be expected from Jenny, the placement of the subjects plays on golden ratios: one glass straddling the left horizontal, while the right divider sits perfectly atwixt the glazen subjects. Vertically, the primary golden ratios provide the containment for the main body of the containers, the lower being positioned at the top of the refracted patterns which perch atop the glass’ stems.

From a subject positional perspective, there is not much else to say. The image, however, has more going for it. Predominantly, this is in the form of the Chiaroscuro tone, offset by the subtler shades to be seen within the window’s light. That, negative space, balanced against the rim-lights of plates providing foreground interest, frames the subject very well, drawing the eye in to contemplate the distortion of pattern that decorates the subjects.

Perhaps the best use one can put wine glasses to…

Irradiance

Adding a new name to those featured here, a recently added Flickr contact, Ali Azimian gets his first outing…

While this may at first appear to simply be a gorgeous portrait shot, it is far more than that. Yes, the subject is a beautiful lady, and that fact alone helps make the image appealing. But it is the right half of the image as negative space that ensures the eye is directed at the model.

The high key processing is an interesting feature, as it largely masks the subject’s features, leaving only the subtlest outline to define her nose… it becomes a process of discovery to obtain definition. This then leaves the face defined by eyes and mouth – a sharply focused triplet without distrcation, the whole wrapped in a border of mostly softly blurred hair.

A stunning entrance; subtle yet powerful.

Winters mists

Again, Adrian produces a stunning composition around the fowl and waterways east of London…

Winters mists

While one might be immediately drawn to the soft tones of this image, and the way the morning mist emulates a shallow depth of field by obscuring the horizon, it is a combination of compositional elements that is the real strength behind it. The more obvious of these is the dominant arc of the river – a leading line into the distance, through the tiny focal point of the swan silhouetted against the reflected sun.

The real power, however, stems from a far more mundane part of the image: the two clumps of foreground roughness, which fulfils a triple role of foreground interest, balanced anchoring elements, and framing elements that point in towards the bird as they offset the negative space of the pastel sky.

Peaceful, yet empowered.

Busy bee bie

While I have been busy of late, I have been keeping an eye open for shots worthy of featuring, and they will show up here over the coming weeks. First in the queue is one from a long-time Flickr friend, Nina Skutton who has been hiding for a while on a new account…

Busy bee bie

The first thing that jumps out about this image is not so much the actual subject as the way the foreground dominates the scene: a pattern of out-of-focus yellow and black – a level of sunflower detail one does not see every day – which provides a series of meshed leading lines, from left to right across the image, where we then discover the bee clinging to a carpet-like rim of feasting-ground: black-and-yellow on yellow-and-black.

It is this positioning on the edge of the arc, cropped in a way that – combined with the depth of field – gives the impression that the sunflower really is a great ball of seething yellow flame.

That the whole falls of not to more of the same yellow tones, but to a world as much green and white and it is defined by backlit petals only serves to hold the eye on the edge of the golden world, negative space pushing back.

A very creative shot: unusual and unique. I want this on my wall.

Essence Of Venice..

I was recently introduced to the work of Stockholm-based photographer Peter Levi, whose work tends towards the black and white – simply because it lets the spirit of the scene shine though.

This image is more than just a solid composition: it is an inspirational technique; an approach to capturing the essence of a setting that I have hot seen before, but which is perfectly suited to the Venetian mystique. San Giorgio Maggiore sits in sharp focus, in the distance, the horizon almost on the centre line, surrounded by the gaping expanse of negative space that is a cloudy sky and the silvery waters of the Laguna Veneta. The monastery’s façade and bell tower are placed perfectly on primary and secondary golden ratios, balanced by the lower profile of the isle extending right-wards.

But these elements are only a part of the scene. The real magic is in the foreground, blurred by both depth of field, and the motion of a the waterways during a 79 second exposure. The triplet of gondolas, ghosted in their gentle sway, truly does capture the spirit of this sinking city…

A masterpiece of imaginative technique enhancing composition.

Inside Dandelions

It’s another outing for my friend Lorraine Anderson, with a look at the detail – and beauty – within.

Inside Dandelions

There are some things around us we take for granted. We see them as they appear at the scale with which we interact with them, but forget to step back to embrace the bigger picture, or have not the patience to peer into the heart of their structure. Here, Lorraine has done the latter, exploring the subtlest detail within a dandelion flower. She has taken dew dops and expanded them to the side of marbles, or crystal balls.

The immediate compositional strength of this image comes, quite obviously, from the shallow depth of field that is a hallmark of macro imagery. Also, there is the clear diagonal – corner to corner – marked out by the dandelion feathers. If that were all, it would be merely a nice shot. There are, however, more elements that come into play here: the leading lines of the stalks, beaded with droplets of morning freshness, that anchor the diagonal to the left side of the image; the repetition of a mysterious image captured within the dozens of crystal balls; the delicate nature of this so often dismissed natural beauty.

Stunning. Soothing.

Quins…

Despite a trip to Hawaii and resultant pictures, it is an image from close to home that is Claire McFarlane‘s next feature here.

Capturing a single butterfly well is difficult enough; five neatly arranged in a compositionally enhancing line is quite a feat. Here, though there are five, two conspire to steal the show, with the other three – varyingly out of focus – providing a strong leading line which also anchors the image. Our main subjects face off against each other, dancing about the primary and secondary golden ratios – an excellent example of how this proportion allows repetitive sub-division which provides for ever more subtle interactions.

The shallow depth of field also serves here, helping to emphasise the primary subjects by separating them both from the softened background and the immediacy of the diagonal leading line.

A shot to be proud of.

%d bloggers like this: