Posts Tagged ‘ sun ’

3 Mallard Ducks

In what is sure to become a regular featuring within these postings, recently added contact Adrian shows off more stunning composition and general photographic appeal.

3 Mallard Ducks

The basics of this image are very straightforward: we have a silhouetted foreground subject which provides a subtle diagonal over a soft and dreamy scene, lit by a newly risen sun placed on the primary golden ratio intersection. Already, it is textbook – contrast of solidity countering the softness of the tones employed.

And then the whole is taken up a notch, beyond the serene, by the inclusion of the titular ducks! The triplet, balances across the right-side secondary golden ratio (for added value, the balance between the single lead bird and the trailing two is naturally much closer to the lead, and that is exactly where the GR is), moving into the scene. A counterpoint within the negative space of that half of the image which manages to flip the composition completely, making the extras into the key subject and the foreground silhouette into framing.

Fabulous.

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A couple of days late, another captivating offering from Kate Mellersh.

As I study this image, I wonder what about it immediately captured my attention. The elements I would normally expect are not present. Instead, there is intensity and a distinct slant on the portrayed reality. Yes, it is the Chiaroscuro-type contrast that makes the subject stand out so prominently: black and white, with only the faintest touches of green-gold outlining the shapes. That glowing hue is perfectly matched by the sky deepening to blue.

A key detail of the image’s composition is the subtle diagonal: corner to corner, yet the subject matter manages to appear not the be arcing in that way. This is nicely offset by the position of the sun in the opposite corner, acting as an anchoring element. Of course, there is the most obvious detail: the inversion. Is it reflection, or an image flipped? (My money is firmly on the latter, for several reasons.) This, I believe, would not work without the sun’s anchoring presence.

Intense, yet subtle.

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